Anzac Biscuits

Anzac biscuits

Today is ANZAC day, so what better way to celebrate the day than to make a batch of Anzac Biscuits.  Well, on second thoughts, there are other ways, one of which was apparently enjoyed this morning at the local RSL Club after the dawn service, by drinking liberal amounts of rum in milk for breakfast!  Rum for breakfast – I don’t think so!

Anyway, back to the baking.  These biscuits enjoy a long history in Australia, and if you are interested to find out more, go here.

  • 150g plain flour
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 100g rolled oats
  • 95g desiccated coconut
  • 140g caster sugar
  • 150g unsalted butter, cut into cubes
  • 1 tablespoon golden syrup
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 30ml water

Preheat a fan-forced oven to 175C.  Line 2 baking trays with baking paper.  Place first 5 ingredients into a large bowl and mix.  Place butter, golden syrup, bicarb soda and water into a saucepan and stir over medium heat just long enough to melt the butter.  Pour into dry ingredients and lightly mix in.  Place teaspoons of mixture on to trays leaving room for spreading.  Bake for approx. 15 minutes until golden brown.  Leave on the trays for a few minutes before cooling on a wire rack.  Store in an airtight container. 

Note that the mixture should be moist enough to form into a mound.  If it is too dry to hold together, just add a little water to bring it to the correct consistency.  Also I like to use a small ice cream scoop to get the biscuits the same size.

Finally, a word of warning – every recipe that I have ever read for Anzac biscuits says that only traditional rolled oats are to be used.  Never use anything that has the word “quick” on the packet. I have no idea why not.  Test it at your peril.  (If you are visited by the black plague, don’t blame me!)

 

 

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ANZAC Cove, Turkey

Tues, June 25

This morning we woke up to find ourselves in ANZAC Cove in Turkey’s Gallipoli Peninsula and led by Captain Kent, we had a very moving service to commemorate the landing in 1915.  It was amazing to be listening to the hymns, prayers and readings while being able to make out Lone Pine in the distance.

We were very lucky to be there at all, as not every ship is granted permission to enter these waters.  The tradition of the wreath laying ceremony at sea could not be performed as Turkey had not given permission, so it was done later once we were outside Turkish waters.

The lone pine tree can just be seen towards the left on top of the hill

The lone pine tree can just be seen towards the left on top of the hill

The Captain leading the service

The Captain leading the service